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Full text of "Redfish Magazine (Australian Edition) (October 2012)"







§•■■* 



ti 




MARINE 



BLOG 



TROPICAL 




Goldsaddle Goatfish Factfile 



First Time at Sea continues! 



Massive cichlid special! 



Inspiring Excellence in Fish Care! 




Maintaining a stable aquarium is one of the keys to ongoing success with marine aquariums. The 
Aqua One Arctic Chiller uses a titanium coil for efficient cooling, with a microprocessor driven digital 
control unit to make control easy and accurate! 



Features & Benefits: 

• Super refrigeration can decrease the 
water temperature rapidly by up to 
7-8°C . 

» The micro-computerised control 
system allows easy operation and 
accurate control. 

• The over current and overheat auto 
protection system make it safe and 
reliable. 



Arctic Chillers Technical Information 




1/6HP 800-2200L/h 1/6HP 



1/4HP 1000-3600L/h 1/4HP 



1/3HP 1200-3600L/h 1/3HP 



3/5HP 1800-4800L/h 3/5HP 



MAX 

L L _ 


WxDxH 


300L 


39x32x46cm 


450L 


38x25x44cm 


650L 


46x39x52cm 










1000L 


48x52x52cm 









1 


- -^ 


3 








Aqua One products are widely available at most quality pet 
retailers. To find your nearest retailer, visit www.aquaone.com.au 



fish contents 



4 About 



redfishmagazine.corn.au 




Off the Shelf 



Cichlids Explored 



Email: enquiries@redfishmagazine.com.au 

Web: redfishmagazine.com.au 

Facebook: facebook.com/redfishmagazine 

Twitter: ©redfishmaaazine 



23 In the Fishroom with Mo Devlin 



29 Reefkeeping Journal: Part V 



Goldsaddle Goatfish 



40 Community listing 



Redfish Publishing. Pty Ltd. 

PO Box 109 Berowra Heights, 

NSW, Australia, 2082. 

ACN: 151 463 759 

Eye Candy Contents Page Photos courtesy: 

(Top row. Left to Right) 

'orange fish' by Joel Kramer 

Tomini Tang' by Nomore3xfive @ flickr 

'Flame Hawkfish' by Nomore3xfive @ flickr 

guana, Galapagos' by Kathy (kthypryn @ flickr) 

Arowana' by Cod Gabriel @ flickr 




(Bottom row. Left to Righ 




'mushrooms' by Nomore3xfive @ flickr 

'Barcelona aquarium' by Alain Feulvarch 

'starfish' by Ryan Vaarsi 

'Online033 Aquarium' by Neil McCrae 



The Fine Print 
Redfish Magazine 

General Advice Warning 

Dntained in this publication is 



or equivalent of, advice from a professional 
larist, aquarium retailer or veterinarian. 

Distribution 

We encourage you to share our website 
nddress online, or with fri< 



About Rec fish 



Redfish is a free-to-read magazine 
for fishkeeping enthusiasts. 



At Redfish we believe in the free exchange of information to 
facilitate success by aguarium and pond hobbyists. Each month 
Redfish Magazine will bring you dedicated sections on tropicc 
coldwater, marine and ponds. 

Redfish was founded in early 2011 by Jess. 



stributed via dov 



Opinions & Views 

)inions and views contained herein are 

:se of the authors of individual articles 

and are not necessarily those 

of Redfish Publishing. 

Ownership and copyright 



Redfish Publishing. Pty Ltd. 

PO Box 109 Berowra Heights, 

NSW, Australia, 2082. 

ACN: 151 463 759 







About « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 4 



Off the Shelf 



Aqua One Nautillus Canister Filters 

Quite, energy efficient and powerful, the Nautilus range of Canister Filters feature easy 
to use technology with a Quick Release Tap System to ensure fast, easy and mess free 
maintenance! 

Priming the filter is simple - all models (excluding the Nautilus 2700UVC) include a built-in 
primer, which primes the filter at the push of a button! The Nautilus 2700UVC also in- 
cludes an ultra violet steriliser to ensure the elimination of free floating algae and harmful 
micro-organisms. 

The modular design of the Nautilus Canister Filters allows for additional filtration media 
to be added so that you can customise the filter to suit your requirements. It also features 
a sophisticated biological and mechanical filtration system, with a selection of 
wool, sponges, bio balls and filter media provided to ensure a perfect set up 
straight away! 

Nautilus Canister Filters are suitable for cold water, tropical & marine setups. 

Aqua One products are widely available at most quality pet retailers. To find your 
nearest retailer, visit www.aquaone.com.au 



«*H>^/ 



Aqua One Radiance Marine LED Reflector 

The Aqua One Radiance Marine LED Light Unit, the most advanced LED ma- 
rine lighting for the seasoned aquarist 




K»ili»pee1iO 




The Radiance Marine LED Light Unit replicates natural lighting creating 
a more realistic and ambient environment for your marine life and also 
aesthetically enhances the look of your aquarium. 

Features & Benefits: 



. -' -'!-■ 



• Programmable Timer- There is no need for electronic timers on power 
outlets, as the Radiance controller allows the user to set the time, date and 
control the photoperiod directly. 

• Moonlight Function - The moonlight intensity follows the actual lunar 
cycle using the time and date programmed into the controller. 

• Manual Mode - The user can set the intensity of both the white and 
the blue LED's independently allowing the overall colour to be customised. 
Power to each colour can be set from 1-100% in 1% increments 

• Incremental Dimming - 6 different time/intensity points can be selected 
allowing a customised sunrise/sunset 

• Energy Saving - Due to the dimming function, less power is used than a non-dimming light unit with comparable power con- 
sumption. 

• Low Heat Output - Unlike metal halide and fluorescent light units, heat is transferred upwards from the unit instead of down- 
wards towards the aquarium. Fans built into the unit keep the unit cool to touch and increases the efficiency of the units. 

• No UV or IR Light - Increased efficiency by converting power to visible wavelengths that are useful for coral growth and elimi- 
nates heat input to the aquarium created by infrared light found in metal halide and fluorescent lighting. 




Aqua One products are widely available at most quality pet retailers. To find your nearest retailer, visit www.aquaone.com.au 



Off the shelf « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 5 



Off the Shelf 



New Era Foods 

for marine, tropical and coldwater f ish 

Over 20 years experience in ornamental aquaculture and wa- 
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With highly digestible and bio-available ingredients sourced from 
around the world (primarily human food grade), New Era prod- 
ucts create minimal waste resulting in significant improvements in 
water quality and greatly reducing pressure on filtration. All our 
diets promote good health, colour, vigour and as a result support 
the immune system. The results are being seen by thousands of 
home aquarists in 30 countries around the world and in over 100 
of the world's most important public aquariums. 

Addicted2Fish are official distributors for: 

New-Era Aquaculture products. 

Food for marine, tropical and coldwater fish. 

Read more at: http://www.addicted2fish.com.au/ 





Protomelas spilonotus - Photo Brian Gratwicke 



Off the shelf « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 6 



Feed your fish the 
same nutritional 
and health 
benefits that have 
been adopted by 
many of the 
world's most 
prestigious public 
aquariums... 




i6raier r " * 




"V| u&v 


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ev 


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Ere 



*mhne flakes 



*!"«hd _L 

CICHUD PELLETS 



ILgsgaAiaSi gxafflatej 



New Era) 

p LEC PELLETS 



'8mm0 pellets 



New Era's advanced diets of large flakes 
and soft pellets are now available from 
leading fish shops.Jn Australia. 




provides a natural grazing experience 




addicted2fish 



health 'colour 'Vitality 



Scan OR code to 
visit addicted2fish 



Mid& Ewplwed 



Information for new cichlidophiles from an ol 



mes by friends 



I have been asked this question many times by friends 

nd family and the reasons are multiple, I think the most 
attractive aspect of cichlidophily is their brood care. 
When I first bred a pair of kribensis (Pelvicachromis / 
cher) in a 80l_tank in my bedroom I knew I was hooked. 
Just watching the parents care for the eggs and in time 
herd their small school of fry around the tank, all the 
time fending off attacks from other community species, 
is enough to intrigue anyone. Most people begin their 
cichlid keeping hobby by buying a single cichlid or a pair of 
cichlids such as angelfish, kribensis or blue rams for their 
community aquarium. In a community setting it rapidly 
becomes apparent that the cichlids are more intelligent 
than most of the other community species. They are 
first to feed and often show complex behaviours such as 



their territory (often the whole tank) from any reflec- 
tions in glass. 

Recently I visited a small aquarium in Chatswood in 

:d about cichlids in 



Ine Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) is a large growing, but com- 
batively peaceful fish . It will eat smaller fishes but is regarded 
fondly by mnay hobbyists for it's intellegence. 



'..did not stock cichlids, as they are too big and aggres- 

|uick look at their tanks indicated this w 
quite the truth, they didn't stock any cichlids other than: 

rs, jewelfish, discus, angelfish, Bolivian and blue r 
kribensis some humphead acaras. This illustrates a couple 
of commonly held myths about cichlids, firstly the sales 
assistant believed the term "cichlids" referred only to the 

fishes of the eastern African rift lakes and seconi 
that all cichlids are aqqressive. 



Cichlids are representative of a large family of fishes with 
pproximately 1700 member species, the cichlids that are 
commonly available in the aquarium are from Central 
and South America, Asia, Madagascar and tropical 
Africa. For the novice hobbyist it is easiest to divide these 
fishes into a number of geographical groups for keeping 
in aquaria. While mixing cichlids from different regions 
is possible, it should only really be done by people with 
experience keeping cichlids. 



A member of the 'h< 
chromis fuscotaenk 



group ot Lake riaiawi cicniias, tnis i\imoo- 
js shows some of the striking colours avail- 
able within the cichlid family. 



I ms article will give you a taste or tne major groups. 
There is, however, an enormous amount of diversity in 
this family. Whether you're looking to setup a community 
tank or a species aquarium for breeding - there's likely 
to be a cichlid that suits your setup. They are, however, 
a group that requires some research before purchase as 
the requirements and behaviour of one species does not 
necessarily translate uniformly across the group. 



5, brightly coloured and fascinating. There's a reason that 
;is (Pelvicachromis pulcher) are so popular with aquarists. 
; is a male, the lesser coloured individual of the two sexes. 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 8 



£wige Cenfaal CUtwriam Ciefdicb 



commonly available genera inciuae: 

Amatitlania (eg: A. nigrofasciatus - Convict cichlid), Amphilophus (eg: A. citrinellum - Red Devil), Hypsophrys (eg: C 

nicaraguense - Parrot cichlid), Herichthys (eg: H. carpinitis - Blue Texas Cichlid), Nandopsis (eg: N. octofasciatus - Jack 

Dempsey), Neetnoplus (eg: N. nematopus), Parachromis (eg: P. managuense -Jaguar Cichli< y , 

- Firemouth Cichlid), Vieja (eg: V. synspilus - Synspilum or Quetzal). 



Genera 


Size 


AGGRESSION 


Sex Ratio 


Breeding method 


Diet 


Amatitlania 


Small/Me- 
dium 


less aggressive to 
aggressive 




Switch (Open/Cave) 

spawn 


Omnivore 


Amphilophus 


Medium/ 
Large 


very aggressive 




Open spawn 


Omnivore 


Herichthys 


Medium/ 
Large 


aggressive 




Open spawn 


Omnivore 


Nandopsis 


Medium/ 
Large 


aggressive to very 
aggressive 




Open spawn 


Omnivore 


Neetroplus 


Small/Me- 
dium 


aggressive to very 
aggressive 




Cave spawn 


Supplement with plant material 


Parachromis 


Large/ 

Very 

Large 


aggressive to very 
aggressive 




Open spawn 


Omnivore 


Rocio 


Medium 


less aggressive to 
aggressive 




Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Thorichthys 


Small/ 
Medium 


less aggressive 




Open spawn 


Omnivore 


Vieja 


Large 


less aggressive to 
aggressive 




Open spawn 


Supplement with plant material 



These fish thrive in neutn 



SKISliHOT? 



-rssrn 



iline water which can range in pH from around 7.0 to 7.5. The smaller gener 
(Thorichthys and Amatitlania, for example) can be kept in 100L tanks. When keeping the larger central cichlids one must 
consider a few factors, a tank size of 200L tank is enough to house only two (a pair) of the larger species such as Vieja 
synspilus or Parapetenia managuense. In cramped guar- 



ters such as these aggression is often heightened and the 
aguarist should have a divider on hand should the female 
need to be separated. For mixed large central Ameri- 
can communities a tank size of 700L must be considered 
the minimum. Smaller central American cichlids such as 
Thorichthys or Neetroplus spp. may be housed in smaller 
tanks down to a minimum of 80L Secondly a large effec- 
tive power filter is essential when keeping these fish as 
they eat a lot and create large amounts of waste. Just a 
guick note on filtration it is useful, particularly with larger 
cichlids, to practice "More's law". It is impossible to have 
water that is over filtered so get more filtration than 
needed when buyin 







m in PnuPAMinM Piqh 



lars grow xo a sunaoie size, ror scavengers plecostomus 

catfish are excellent as their armor protects them from 

the attentions of a territorial cichlid. Other catfish include 

two Australian native species firstly Tandanus tandanus, the Dewfis 

Plotosidae) do well, however as with any catfishes in such a tank, ar 



is a largely foraotten tren^i ire frnm thk nrnnn Rnrelv kent even 

more rarely breu. i iuiviuuu luiuui i iy Lypii_uny n i ipi uvc^ wi li i uyc. 
These beautiful cichlids are surely due a renaissance. 



«iti«BitK»attwiiraMBawwiiM«a»«mwtra»i»i»iUM wmiira 



mple cover is necessary to hide them from the prov\ 



is attention. 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 9 



i 



A 






- v 




cichlids are another Central Amet 



nn gem. They are harder to breed than Convicts (below) but this is a good thing, as 
some senses Convicts are a little fertile for many aguarists. Photo by Budi Lukman. 










stems from incider 

for which the Cor 



it is mixed 



:he wrong speci 
) by Budi Lukmc 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 10 



Plants for large American Cichlids 

It is difficult to keep plants with these larger cichlids - some 
of the tougher plants are worth a go. In particular Java fern 
(Microsorium pteropus) or Anubias sp. are effective but be 
sure to weight the plants down with larger pebbles to pre- 
vent the cichlids dislodging them. Personally I dislike plastic 
plants but they can look effective if mixed with real plants. 
I would use a lot of rockwork and some large pieces of 
wood - avoid plants and the hassles associated with them 
in large central American cichlid communities. 

Smiifi GbneMiciuti QicMitLs 



In the hobby this group is typically divided and the "Dwarf 
Cichlids" are carved off into a group of their own, I've repli- 
cated this division in the tables below - but it's not a division 
that's supported by taxonomy (or sometimes even behav- 
iour), it's simply about size and the conseguences of being 
either large or small. For example, Geophagus spp. are 
clearly large - but behave mostly more like dwarf cichlids 
than some other larger South American cichlids. 




Larger South American Cichlids 

Commonly available genera include: 

Aequidens (eg: A. pulcher- Blue Acara), Astronotus (eg: A. ocellatus - Oscar), Cichla (eg 

C. portalegrense - Port Acara), Geophagus (eg: G. suhnamensis), Guianacara (eg: G ge< 



Geophagine cichlids are notable not for their bright base colours, 

but for their irridescent sclaes which shine brightly under good 

lighting. As a bonus, most geophagine cichlids are peaceful 

aguarium residents - and relatively large individuals can be kept 

with modestly smaller fishes without fear of the smaller fish 

secoming prey. It is important to provide a fine substarte so they 

an indulge in their favourite feeding style "earth eating". This is a 

juvenile Gymnogeophagus meridionalis. 



Cichlasoma fe 



agus (eg: G balzanii), Hems (eg: 



-everus - beverurr 



iypselacara (eg: 



poralis - Chocolate cichlid), Mesonauta 



(eg: M. festivus - flag acara), Pterophyllum (eg: P. scalare - Angelfish) Satanoperca (eg: S. jurupari), Symhysodon (eg: 5. 
discus - Discus) Uaru (eg: U. amphiacanthoides - Uaru). 



Genera 


Size 


AGGRESSION 


Sex Ratio 


Breeding method 


Diet 


Aequidens 


Small 
to Large 


less aggressive to 
aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Astronotus 


Large 


aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Omnivore Opportunistic pisci- 
vore 


Ochla 


Very 
Large 


less aggressive to 
aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Specialised predator 


Ochlasoma 


Medium 


less aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Geophagus 


Medium 
to Large 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


Species 
specific 


Species specific 


Omnivore Substrate sifter 


Guianacara 


Small to 
Medium 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Gymnogeophagus 


Medium 
to Large 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


1:3 


Some mouthbrooding. 
Species specific. 


Omnivore Substrate sifter 


Heros 


Medium 
to Large 


less aggressive to 
aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Supplement with plant material 


Hypselacara 


Medium 
to Large 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Supplement with plant material 


Mesonauta 


Small to 
Medium 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Supplement with plant material 


Pteryophyllum 


Small to 
Medium 


unaggressive 


1:1 


Leaf spawner 


Omnivore Micropredator 


Symhysodon 


Small to 
Medium 


shy to unaggres- 
sive 


1:1 


Leaf spawner 


Omnivore Micropredator 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 11 



Dwarf South American Cichlids 

Commonly available genera include: 

Apistogramma sp. (eg. A cacatuoides - the Cockatoo Cichlid), Cleithracara sp, (eg. C. 
Dicrossus sp. (eg. D. filamentosus - Checkerboard cichlids), Laetacara sp. (eg, L dorsig 
Mikrogeophaus sp. (eg. M. ramirezi - the Blue R< 



ml - the Keyhole Cichlid), 
the Red Breasted Cichlid" 



HlillHvi5fflf«5fv5fi 



■f3SHvSl7f7*7ft7l7f*)] 



Genera 


Size 


AGGRESSION 


Sex Ratio 


Breeding method 


Diet 


Apistogramma 


Small 


unaggresive 


Varies. 


Cave spawner 


Omnivore 


Cleithracara 


Medium 


unaggresive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Dicrossus 


Small 


unaggressive 


1:1 (some harems) 


Leaf spawner 


Omnivore 


Laetacara 


Small to 
Medium 


unaggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Mikrogeophagus 


Small 


unaggressive 


1:1 (sometimes forms 
harems in larger 
tanks) 


Open spawner 


Omnivore 


Nannacara 


Small 


unaggressive 


1:1 


Open spawner (some- 
times spawns in cryptic 
locations) 


Omnivore 



With perhaps the exception of the cichlids of Lake Tan- 
ganjika, South American cichlids in general show the 
most varied patterns of reproduction along with the 
most highly developed brood care. Brood care appears 
to be most highly developed in monogamous cichlids, 

1 " " ' " ' 'ers or substrc ' 

ers. The majority of larger South American species are 
monogamous open sp although some Geophagines 
and Heros species are polygamous mouthbrooders. 

The genus Apistogramma contains a huge number 
of species most of which are polygamous breeders. 
In general South American cichlids tend to be more 
peaceful than their Central American cousins although 
some of the South American species (eg: Oscars) have 

iression in South 
American cichlids is mostly due to limited tank size and 
when housed in l< 
are guite passive. 



=sonauta 



For the novice aguarist South American cichlids are 
perhaps the most difficult cichlids to keep correctly as 
they are an extremly variable group. Some genera, 
such as Pteryophyllum, Symhysodon and Mesonauta 
are particularly placid even shy and should all be kept 
in tall tanks with sufficient vegetation to provide cover 
for these fishes. 

Tall plants, in particular Vallisneria, are favoured by 
these peaceful cichlids. In contrast to the peaceful 
nature of angel and discus-fish the larger Aequidens 
species, along with Astronotus species can be more 
aggressive and should not be kept in limited tank 
space or with any fish small enough to be considered 
a food item. Severums are less aggressive than oscars 
although far too aggressive to be kept with dwarf 



nature or 




raightforward to keep. Some species are prone to inexplicable 

illness and breeding can be challenging. 




Keyhole cichlid is larger than most dwart cichlids , despite this 
s a placid species that does well even with quite small hetero- 
cifics. Breeding the Keyhole is not without ahallenges, the shy- 
ss of the species means many spawns are abandoned unless 

sufficient cover is provided 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 12 




$ 




world like a Central American 



Red Terr 



/as cichlid) is a stunnma colou 



aggressive 



America. Unusually the female is more 



I 




^kfl A 




~he beautiful Thread-Fin Acara is a 
;s has irridescent spots on its flanks 



/ geophagine cichlid v 
ge growing but peac 



long flowing fin filaments. Like many geophagine cichlids, the 
the species is ideal for many aauariums but infreauently kept. 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 13 



the medium sized "acaras" such as "Aequidens" puchler, Krobia itanyi or Cichlasoma portalgrense. 

Suitable plants and companion fishes 



Genera 


Companion fishes 


Suitable plants 


Dwarf cichlids, Angelfish, Discus or 
Mesonauta 


Larger rasporas, tetras & cory- 
doras catfish 


All plant species are useful, particularly tall species. 


Geophagines, "Acaras", Severums, 
Chocolate Cichlids (Hypselacara) 


Larger barbs (Spanner/Clown), 
botias & locariid catfish 


Hardy plant species such as Java fern and Anubias, 
although severums and chocolate cichlids will place 
significant demands on the toughness of plant species 
used. 


Oscars or larger acaras ("A". 
rivulatus) 


Larger barbs, botias & larger 
locariid catfish 


Only very hardy plant species useful, fish will uproot 
plants and plastic plants may provide a solution. 



£akz Vidtmia mid .take, Jile&ami dicfdufo 



Commonly available genera include: 

Astatotilapia (Syn: Haplochromis) (eg: A. nyrerei - Flameback), Aulonocara (eg: A. jacobfreibergi), Chilotilapia (eg: C. 

: C. moori - Malawi Dolphin), Dimidochromis (eg: D. 

. . ,......,.. _,._.. - ■. - .-j- -'■ rostratus), Labeotropheus (eg: L fuelleborni), Labidochromis 

(eg: L. caeruleus - Electric Yellow), Maylandia (eg: M. lombardoi), Melanochromis (eg: M. johanni), Nimbochromis (eg: 
N. venustus), Otopharnx (eg O. lithobates), Placidochromis (eg: P. electro), Protomelas (P. taeniolatus - Red Empress), 

j: T. macrostoma). 









Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 14 



:le shells, s 



nso workwf 



or crushed coral acts as a buffer to keep the pH and c 
wish to avoid the use of carbonaceous rocks/substrate 



H where it should be, specialised buffe 



Genera 


Size 


AGGRESSION 


Sex Ratio 


Diet 


Astatotilapia 


Medium 


moderately aggressive 


1:4 


Omnivore 


Aulonocara 


Medium 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Chilotilapia 


Medium 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Snail feeder Omnivore 


Copadichromis 


Medium to large 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Cyrtocara 


Medium to large 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Dimidichromis 


Medium to large 


less aggressive to aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Fossochromis 


Large 


less aggressive to aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Labeotropheus 


Small to medium 


very aggressive 


1:5 


Algal grazer 


Labidochromis 


Small to medium 


less aggressive to aggressive 


1:3 


Algal grazer 


Maylandia 


Small to medium 


very aggressive 


1:5 


Algal grazer 


Nimbochromis 


Large 


aggressive 


1:3 


Ambush predator Omnivore 


Otopharnx 


Medium 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Placidochromis 


Medium to large 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Snail feeder Omnivore 


Protomelas 


Medium to large 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


Sciaenochromis 


Medium to large 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Omnivore 


lyrannochromis 


Large 


very aggressive 


1:3 


Ambush predator 



tt 




<fc r 



r- -*- < 



ke Malawi recreated beautifully here by an i 
tively large pieces of stone. The cic 



Photo by Lee Nachr 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 15 



SSHi*m*jIISISkImnI[SI 



3tiK«Elt?5rclSE 



tificially erected by many for purposes of aquc 



pheus, Melanochromis, Labidohromis and Labeochromi. 
This group is often referred to as mbuna. Mbuna in 
the native tongue of the Malawi people literally means 
'rockfish' and refers to the fact that these fish inhabit 
the rocky zone of the lake close to the shore. With 
space at a premium these fishes tend to be VERY ag- 
gressive and are best kept with other species from this 
group. Lake Victoria cichlids such as Astatotilipia sp. 
may be kept with the ultra-aggressive fishes from the 
the aforementioned mbun< 



The second group of fishes include the less aggressive 
Aulonocara genera and other fish from related gener 
these species live on the s< 
lake, only returning to the fringes of the rocky zone foi 
breeding. With less space restrictions the aggression 
between these species is far less, Aulonocara males 
have brilliant blues/yellows and oranges and are pos- 
sibly the brightest of any freshwater fish. 



Nimbochromines and the species in the genus Tyranno- 
chromis are specialised ambush predators and as such 
should not be housed with smaller mbuna unless the 
small fish has many refuges in which to hide. Malawi 
cichlids are all quite closely related and interbreeding is 
common in community tanks. For breeding purposes all 
Lake Malawi/Victoria/Tanganjikan fishes should be kept 
in individual species tanks. If your cichlids do hybridise 
do not sell on the youna. 



A similar rule applies to keeping the Lake Malawi as to 
keeping the central and south American cousins. Buy 
the fish based on their adult size. Do not buy fishes 
that are much smaller than your largest fish, or chanc- 
es are, that fish will make the next meal. The armored 
Locaridaceae catfishes make efficient scavengers as 
well as the larger members of the Synodontis group. 
Botias, if they are large, cope well with the water 
chemistry and the aggression of the cichlids. 
To reduce aggression in these fishes there are two 
basic approaches: 



A school of 6-10 Australian or New Guinea rainbow 
fish make excellent dither/target fish in an East Afri- 
can aquarium. Rainbow fishes enjoy the same hard 
alkaline water as the east African cichlids and the fact 
that they are fast swimmers helps them to get out of 
a pinch when they are being chased. They also occupy 
the upper half of the aquarium which adds greatly to 
the aesthetic value of dither fish. Dither fish seem to 
distract cichlids from each other and can reduce injuries 
on other cichlids significantly. 



reauce injun 





colours available in the Lake Mala\ 



on other 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:15 » 16 



CONTROLLED OVERCROWDING: 

Overcrowding is a extremely effective method of 
aggression reducing in African cichlids, particuk ' 
mbuna. Overcrowding works by not allowing indi- 
vidual fish to establish large territories and therefore 
becoming hyper dominant. It also spreads the ag- 
gression from a dominant individual out amongst < 
larger number offish. 

Plants for laice Malawi & Lake Victoria 
Cichlids 

It is almost impossible to keep plants with these 
cichlids, particularly the algal grazing mbuna. Tough 
plants such as Java fern and Anubias species may be 
of some use with Aulonocara and other less veg- 
etarian species. 






Rainbowfish make great ditherfish for cichlids. In addition, th 

enjoy the same hard, alkaline water making them ideal choices f 

companion fishes. Keep in groups of 4+. Photo by Boscosar 





tr*NHJ 






' 








^p - 




1 - .sf.-i 





A young male Pseudotropheus sp. "Elongatus Mpanga". Photo by Budi Lukman. 

£a!kz Jatigatufi&ati Qiehlids 

Lake Tanganyika in East Africa hosts a diverse array of cichlids whose behaviour and reproductive strategies are 
more diverse than the neiahbourina lakes of Malawi < 



regani), Chalinochromis (eg: C. brichardi), Cyathopharnx (eg: C. furcifer), Cyphotilapia (eg: C. frontosa), Cyprichromis 

' ~ '""■" --■'■-■---• r -- - --'■■- "---■ r '■'■—— impsii), Lepidolamprologus (eg: L. attenuatus), Neolamprologus (eg: N. ocel- 

latus), Opthalmotilapia (eg: O. boops), Paracyprichromis (eg: P. nigripinnis), Spathodus (eg: 5. erythrodon), Tanganico- 
, , j: T. moorii), Xenotilapia (eg: X. ochrogenys). 



Although Tanganyikan cichlids are similar to the cichlids of Lake Malawi, they differ as follows. Lake Tanganyikan cichlids 
require higher pH water from 8,0 to 9,5 with higher hardness requirements. They are also, normally, more expensive 
to the aquarist than the mbuna or Aulonocara sp. of Lake Malawi. Since most of these fishes are quite "pricey" it 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 17 



Genera 


Size 


AGGRESSION 


Sex Ratio 


Breeding method 


Diet 


Altolamprologus 


Small to 
Medium 


less aggressive 


1:1 


Cave/Shell Spawner 


Micropredator 


Eretmodus 


Dwarf to 
Small 


unaggressive 


1:1 


Biparental mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 


Julidochromis 


Small to 
Medium 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


1:1 


Cave spawner 


Omnivore Micropredator 


Cyathopharnx 


Medium 
to Large 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


2:5 


Pit spawner 


Omnivore Supplement with 
vegetable material 


Cyphotilapia 


Large 


less aggressive 


1:3 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Omnivore Opportunistic pisci- 
vore 


Cyprichromis 


Small ro 
Medium 


unaggressive 


2:5 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 


Ectodus 


Small to 
Medium 


unaggressive 


1:3 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Leipidolamprolo- 
9 US 


Medium 
to Large 


aggressive to very 
aggressive 


1:1 


Cave spawner 


Specialised predator 


Neolamprologus 


Dwarf to 
Medium 


less aggressive to 
very aggressive 


Species 
specific 


Species specific 


Micropredator Omnivore. 


Opthalmotilapia 


Small to 
Medium 


unagressive 


1:3 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 


Paracyphchromis 


Small to 
Medium 


shy to unaggres- 
sive 


2:5 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 


Spathodus 


Dwarf to 
Small 


shy to unaggres- 
sive 


1:1 


Biparental mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 


Tangicodus 


Dwarf to 
Small 


shy to unaggres- 
sive 


1:1 


Biparental mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 


Tropheus 


Medium 


aggressive to very 
aggressive 


Species 
specific 


Maternal mouthbrooder 


Algal Grazer 


Xenotilapia 


Small to 
Medium 


less aggressive 


1:1 


Biparental mouthbrooder 


Omnivore 



follows that many are more difficult to keep healthy or 
breed more slowly. For these reasons it is recommended 
that they be kept separately to Lake Malawi cichlids. Body 
form also tends to differ more in Lake Tanganyikan cichlids 
than in the fishes of Lake Malawi. 



; J.- 



Personally I have seen tanks that mix full size frontosa 
(around 30cm) with breeding colonies of Neolamprogus 
brichardi and the tiny shell dwelling Neolamprologus mul- 
tifasciatus (round 3cms), this shouk 



*>:■-- i.Vj1 



rium wit! 



spaces Tor 



smaller fishes. The results in these tanks are spectaa 
like a slice of life in Lake Tanganjika. 






Dither fish work with the Lake Tanganyikan cichlids as 
described above for the other Afria 
Lake Tanganyikan cichlids are relatively tolerant of plants 
with the exception of the algal grazing species such as Tro- 
pheus spp. Many plants however do not tolerate the hard, 
alkaline water well. Best choices are Anubias spp. Java fern 
and lava Moss, 



One of the most iconic Tanganyikan cichlid are from the genus 
Tropheus. These compact-bodied, aggressive, vegetarian cichlids 
have < 

aggressive and should be kept in large groups in species tanks to 
assist to spread the heckling amongst the largest number of indi- 
viduals possible. If you're interested in keeping Tropheus seek out 
a n aquarium that specialises in cichlids or hobbyists who have a 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 18 






<>•*. 






iochromis ornatus 'Gold' . Photo by Dr. lessica Drake 



Chalinochromis ndobnoi. Photo by Dr. Jessica Drake 



\*. 









^ 


■ *3K 


A 


k. 


V 




•te. 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 19 



LAMPROLOGINE BREEDING HABITS 



Genera 


Species 


FAMILY STRUCTURE 


DECOR 


Type 1: Cave Spawners 


eg: N, caudopunctatus, N, cylindricus, N, 
lelupi, N, mustax and similar species. 


Monogamous 


Terracotta pots and 
saucers are useful. 


Type II: Step breeders 
(Cave Spawning) 


eg: N. brichardi complex 


Monogamous 


Terracotta pots and 
saucers are useful. 


Type III: Shell dwellers 


eg: N. brevis, N, multifasciatus, N, ocellatus, 
N, speciosis 


Polygamous 1:3 


Mollusc shells. 



We&t (Zpaeati Ckfdid^ 

Commonly availble species include 

Anomalochromis sp, (Thomasii cichlids), Hemi 
cichlids), Pelvicachromis sp. (eg. Kribensis) and 



lis sp. (eg: Jewel Cichlids), Steatocranus sp. (eg: Lion or Buffalc 
a (eg: T. buttikoferi). 



Only a relatively small range of West African cichlids are available to the cichlid keeping hobby, particularly in Austra- 
lia where the import of most West African cichlids is prohibited. These fishes thrive in moderately soft water which is 
neutral to slightly acidic in pH. Commonly available West African Dwarf cichlids such as Nanochromis sp. Anomalo- 
chromis thomasi and Pelvicachromis sp. are the most commonly encountered fish in the group and are the best group 
for newcomers to these fish. The Hemichromines and Tilapia sp. reguire larger tanks and more resilient companion 



fish than the aforementioned West African dwarf cichlids. Fishes such as the lionhead (Steatocranus casuahus) reguire 
very high levels of oxygen as they come from the rapids of Zaire rivers, be sure to include a power head in tanks with 
Steatocranus sp. There are at least six species of Hemichomines available in Australia. 



Companion Fish for West African Cichlids 

Useful dither fish include the larger barbs - rosy, tiger barbs and the like and or Australian Rainbow fish. Useful scaver 
gers are the smaller locarid catfishes e.g. bristlenose catfish, twig catfish or whiptail catfish. 




Z#fi 




«** 



^eivicacnromis uebc 



_iu mas max rival inese pmi-si^cu, peuu=iui i ib 

An underrated West African qem! Pictured: P. 



zher (temale) 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 20 



Plants for West African Cichlids 

Unlike their East African cousins who dwell in Lakes 
most West African cichlids hail from rivers, strec 
ponds, environments not short of plant life. It's not s 



prising therefore that these fish like a well planted tank. 



Again use tougher plants such as Java fern i 

sp. Use rock and wood to create numerous caves and 

re guite non aggressive. 
Most species of west african cichlids are guite tolerant o 
plants although some Tilapia species do dig. 



,S/S*/H*M^ 




a Temaie reivicacnromis taenia! 




For reasons that aren't clear, like Pelvicachromis sp., Jew 
colours suggest they should be. They are aggressive when b 



s from the genus Hemichromis aren't nearly as popular as their 
but not notably more than East African cichlids - so this lack of 



by hobbyist 



■uprising. 





^ 



* 



Steatocranus tinanti isn't going to win any beauty contests, 
but what it lacks in colour it makes up for in personality. Ar 
excellent fish the for advanced cichlid aguarist. 



(the Lionhead, Blockhead, Buffalohead cichlid). The female (in 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 21 



Genera 


Size 


AGGRESSION 


Sex Ratio 


Breeding 
style 


Diet 


Anomalochromis 


Small 


unaggressive 


1:1 


Substrate 
spawner 


Unfussy omnivore 


Hemichromis 


Small to Medium 


aggressive to very 
aggressive 


1:1 


Substrate 
spawner 


Omnivore Micropredator 


Pelvicachromis 


Small 


unaggressive 


1:1 - 1:2 


Cave 
spawner 


Unfussy omnivore 


Steatocranus 


Small to Medium 


unaggressive to 
less aggressive 


1:1 


Cave 
spawner 


Omnivore Micropredator 


Tilapia 


Small to Large 


unaggressive to 
very aggressive 


Species 
specific 


Species 
specific 


Species specific Mainly 
omnivores 






nis thomasi. Photo by Budi Lukman. 



Close 

Cichlids are amazing fish. Their brood care is unrivalled 
in the fish keeping hobby and their fascinating, beautiful 
animals. While many species c 
aggression can be managed provided suitable husbandry 
is adopted. If you're interested in cichlids, or we've inspired 
you to have a look at these fish again, find yourself a store 
that specialises in cichlids (or at least has several dedicated 
cichlid aguaria). Good advice is key to not having a bad ex- 
perience with these fishes, get the setup and stocking right 
and you'll be rewarded. 



> 




borne I ilapia species are illegal in some junstictions as theyve 
)ecome a pest species in local rivers. Check with local authori- 



Tropical « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 22 



Today In The Fishroom 



with Mo Devlin 







Text bj Mo Devlin. All photos, unless otherwise stated, are by Mo Devlin. 



I have a bucket list of future 
photos. Right at the top of that 
list... is. ..was... photographing some 
of the largest fish in the world. 
I got that opportunity during 
a recent visit to Atlanta, Geor- 
gia. The Georgia Aquarium in 
downtown Atlanta is the largest 
in the world, with more than 8.5 
million U.S. gallons of water and 
housing 120,000 animals in 500 
different species. 

The aquarium has the unique 
distinction of housing two of the 
world's largest fish, the giant 
whale shark. At one point they 
had a total of four. Due to some 
health issues, they lost two and 
now have two babies, both the 
size of a large sedan. The origi- 
nal four fish arrived from Taiwan 
and were named after the old 
"Honeymooner's" TV Show: 
Ralph, Norton, Alice and Trixie. 





The front of the Georgia Aquarium. Photo by Rian Castillo. 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 24 




The world's largest fish, the Whale Shark. 



Outside of Asia, the Georgia 
Aquarium is the only institution 
to house this fish. 

As I turned the corner into the 
Ocean Voyager viewing win- 
dow, I had to stop to catch my 
breath. It is quite simply, amaz- 
ing. The second largest viewing 
window in the world, it's 27 feet 
high, 63 feet wide and weighs 
120 tons. The acrylic that sepa- 
rated me from 6.5 million gallons 
of water and thousands offish 
was two feet thick. But the ef- 
fect was as if you were right on 
the sea bottom and could reach 
out and touch the fish. 

Built in November 2005, the 
aquarium was funded mostly by 




The Weedy Seadragon is native to Australia's southern coastline. 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 25 




A 



e. tfvcr'v-flie- 



7 



'TLyt^rr 5e.p^vr-tfv'Tc.^: /wie. -4-ro/n cp..Z> as\\\\{Oa ^-Jlo/is 



-r- Vv/^v'fe.r- tfv/)^: TL|Oi/5tfv/l<^5 O-V" -4-I5H v\/tfv5 'TVv/O -^ccf" *tL,ic.I<. 




Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 26 



Cleaner Wrasse cleaning gills. 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 27 



the co-founder of Home Depot, 
Bernard Marcus. The aquarium 
itself was constructed to be very 
user friendly, providing windows 
and ports along the way all at 
kid height to encourage view- 
ing and quiet reflection on the 
beautiful sea life scenery. The 
entrance into the Ocean Voy- 
ager's theater is through a large 
tunnel. This also provided me 
with a unique opportunity for 
photos. Where else could you 
be at the bottom of the sea 
photographing sea life above? 

As we walked through the 
tunnel I was treated to a very 
unique example of the symbiotic 
relationship between sea life. 
Pressed very close to the bot- 
tom of the glass window was 
a giant grouper. I watched in 
amazement as two tiny Wrasse 
went about the task of cleaning 
the gill rakers of this monster 
sized fish. 



One other exhibit that proved 
very interesting at the aquari- 
um, "Frogs - a Chorus of Col- 
ors", featured a look at fifteen 
different species of frogs. The 
exhibit itself is touted as the 
most advanced traveling frog 
show in the U.S.A. Featuring 
everything from the beautifully 
colored Poison Dart Frogs to 
the enormous African bull frog. 
Although not my cup of tea so 
to speak, they did offer interest- 
ing subject matter for some 
colorful photos. 

All in all it was a wonderful 
experience. So much sea life 
and so many opportunities to 
capture images. I encourage 
anyone with the opportunity to 
see the aquarium, to go. Bring 
your camera and bring a small 
cushion. Once you enter the 
Ocean Voyager theater, you will 
be there for a long time. Cross 
one off the bucket list. 




Maintenance - giant aquarium style (top), 
memsmerising jellies (mid) float in the 
water column and below - an enormous, but 
amazingly coloured African Bull Frog. 




ABOUT THE AUTHOR 



;r of Aquamoio.Com. He 



lousand qallons of fresh 



/ears in the hobby he has successfully bred many of the Central and South American 
ssion for New World cichlids is only rivaled by his love of photography. Over the year 



:er tanks. Ov< 

:hlid fishes. 



posted image 



across many nc 



mternation< 



forums. Mo has spent two terms on the bo 
nization in 2010, and has been the Publicity 



:>ard of trust 



rman forth 



s for the Americ 
the past decade. 



First Time at Sea 

a reefae&pinfi journal 



<MLL 




a beautiful peach coloured Trachyphyllia 
geoffroyi from the folks at Cairns Marine. 



It's tk& 6 HA<?ntK HA^rk and tkis HACntk 
fi^S seen some interesting ck^n^es t<? tke 
aoa.arnA.wv. I've added GOWV& n6lA> b&OlAtiflAl 
cordis frem 6#irns 7/Urine to tke aojAor- 
iiAw., coralkne alO)a& is kre^innin^ to ^jrci/o 
on tke qIogg and Stone novo in impressive 
^HA<wnts. Tke cords and fisk <#re ^cin^j 
ia>&11 Tkis montk 1' (.(. ^ive you. o look at tke 
nei/J li^jkts, (A>k<#t I'm f&edi.nO) <#n^ seme 
b&OtAtiftAl n&yo addi.ti.onG. 

Ag moGt of VjOiA voill knciAJ tke A^W-^ee-f 

550 setw.p skips (AJttK <^W TS ti^kts -- 

i/okick kov3 (?een Of&ot — and tkis mcntk 

I'm aiA^m.&ntinOj tkeir oiAtpiAt b(j adding 

Gom& n&vo l£D (.i^kts to tke aajAor'uAw.. 

for tKis I've cWoG&n tke AotAo3&am. 600 

Ultra Fiji from Aaa.aR.ai/). Tke combo pack 

I've ^^e^ containG tvoo li^jkts, «# Fiji l3Ue 

and a "Reef 13>Ue Tke (.i^jkts tkemsetves 

ar& vary slim ^n^ ti^fvt (aG skciAM ri^kt). to 

^et an id&a of tkeir oiAtpiAt I tw.me^ tkem 

on in mt) living room. YIoia) I knei/o <#t tke 

time tket) i/oere different ccl.0M.rs - Utf to 

^<wr e^e (.coking at tke Fiji 13Ue ^n^ 

tke "Reef 13>Ue 1£Dg tket) appear utmost 

identical It's <9^viCM.s(^) a limitation in WiA.rn.an vision and botW mt) pkotos o-f tKe lights and tKe 

(.i^ktin^ on tke aajAor'uAw. itself demonstrates tfi^t tket) ^.re in^ee^ vert) different colours (see tke 

pKctc on paQ& 321 




Augmenting the quad T5 lighting that comes 

shipped with the AquaReef 350, I've added 

two LED strips from AquaRay. 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 29 



Inspiring Excellence in Fish Care! 



AquaReef - The Ultimate (M/MMl 

Aquarium 



Inbuilt sump filtration system 
The specially designed cabinets 
with no back panel offer ample 
ventilation to reduce heat and 
humidity build-up 
A chiller can be added to the 
system without the need for 
extra pumps 

Highest quality 'white' glass to 
fronts on the 300 & 400 models, 
all 3 sides on the 275 cube 
ensure optimum clarity 
Cabinet comes built and is 
exclusively manufactured from 
alloy frame and plastics to 
ensure maximum resistance 
to salt and moisture damage 



aquariums 

All models fitted with Aqua 

One's patented 'Quadrolite' T5 

lighting system with reflector 

panels to increase light output 

and 4 x T5 tubes to provide 

a balanced, visually pleasing 

spectrum 

Combines wet/dry filtration with 

a venturi style protein skimmer 

with needle wheel pump to 

ensure excellent water qualit. 

Has a flexible duckbill outlet 

to return water back to the 

aquarium 



" *&J5K r 






MODEL 


VOLUME 


DIMENSIONS 


\» 


L+_ AquaReef300 


300L 


102Lx52Dx73/88cmH 


* 


AquaReef 400 


400L 


132Lx52Dx73/88cmH 


| 


"* AquaReef 275 
1 


275L 


70 L x 70 D x 77/79 cm H 





Aqua One products are widely available at most quality pet 
retailers. To find your nearest retailer, visit www.aquaone.com.au 



Installation is refreshingly Simple, 
1 cut the alumimum rails from 
AaiA.d2.aiJ) to the correct length us- 
ing a hack sat/0, after measuring the 
span across the top of the aquarium. 
On the Aaud&eef350 there's a fan- 
tastic lip to mount the rails on al- 
ready available inside the hood. Once 
1 cut the rails to size, 1 slide the 
l£D strips onto the rails and placed 
it adjacent to the T5 kghts. 'Easy. 

The effect is pretty striking, the T5 
kghts (tAihich are 2Y~ i^hite and 2Y~ 
actinic) tend to give everything the 
aauanum a bit of a yellowish red 
colour. Turning on the V£Ds in ad- 
dition to the T5 makes for a vohole 
nevo visual experience. C\reens are 
greener, reds are redder, blues are 
bluer. It's very pretty and without 
wholesale changes the hood is also 
pretty convienient 




To the naked eye, these two LED strips look veri- 
similar in colour, but the cameras sensor shows 
the Fiji Blue (top) and the Reef Blue (bottom). 




Inside the hood of the AquaReef 350 there's a 
lip that's perfect for adding the AquaRay LED 
lights. Installation is simple, cut the alumini- 
um rails to length and install next to the pre- 
installed T5 lights. So easy, even I can do it! 



i£D lighting has made for a bit of a 
revolution in marine reef systems. It's 
lovo cost compared to metal hallides 

and has made the marine keeping hobby more acces'ible to more people. yOith V£D lights (or metal 
halkdes for that matter) there's an intiti^t outlay of money to get it setup, however, the benefits of 
LED over metal hallides are numerous. They include lovoer wattage — these AaudRay lights are 
only 12 voatts — and they put out a considerable amount of light output and relatively tittU heat 
They're also great for the environment as their long lasting, more than 50,000 hours bulb life, they 
are made using a small carbon -footprint and they (unlike metal hallide lamps) are free of toxic 
metals like mercury. Having installed these on my Aaud&eef 350, 1 honestly can't imagine the 
system without the extra colour and voater shimmer they provide. 1' (1 report any changes in coral 
performance over the coming months. 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 31 




and the £5 lights in combination with the new AquaBeam600 Ultra Fiji Combo 
pack. The difference in the intensity of the greens, reds and blue colours in 

ths aquarium is, being totally frank, astounding. 

In terms o$ feeding, I've been using TYeiA) Eia foods. YUia> 'Era's a relative newcomer to tWe fish. 
■food area - but they are making a bit c-f a splash i/Jitk a range o-f tkeir products. They make a 
range ot pjli^ts, Slake and grazing discs, for mij system, votikjust tkree fish, tke grazing discs 
are too muck -food -- but 1 can, and nave, used tkem temporarily and tke Kole Tang emerges 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 32 



CAIRNS MARINE, t ,,n 
the Marine Aquarium Council 




&. 



Ij 


\ 








£ 




i 


. j|^H 




Hk 





CAIRNS MARINE is the worlds leading supplier 

of sustainably sourced marine aquarium specimens. 

UUUUUU.CQirnsmorin0.com 



cairnsm©rine 

Collection ; Education ! Research 



from his hiding place amongst 
the rocks to brovose on the discs. 
3oth the Tang and clovons cat 
the pallets, ttfkch arc the sink- 
ing variety. The soft p4Uts arc 
good for -feeding some of my 
fkngia and some of the small 
anemones in the aauarium 
— most of these anemones are 
fire Anemones (Aotinod&ndron 
plumosum) 1 probably shouldn't 
be feeding them - but thus far they seem harm- 
less enough and 1 rather like their feathery ten- 
tacles. 

In terms of nevo stock, the staff at Cams TfXanne 
have supplied me voith some lovely corals. Including 
a beautiful peach coloured Trackyphgllid geo-f-frogi 
(photo on page 29, an amazingly green Gion.ia.strm, 
stunning 6(onipora, a bicoloured Lo(?opfa)[[ia, a 
green and pink Ptesiastrm versipora, a beautifully 
patterned yYlicrom.iA.ssa aw.akus3nsis, some lovely 
green domed mushrooms (Gydosms cyclolites) and 
a number of others V (1 feature over the coming 




The items from the ]Jew Era range that I've been feeding my fish 

and corals. The grazing discs attach to a suction cup which is 

a clever feature of this food. Ideal for tangs and similar. 





A really beautiful green Goniaetrea from 
Cairns Marine! 



Zoanthide under AquaRay LEDs only 

(top), quad T5s only (middle) and 

with both LEDs and quad T5s (Bottom). 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 34 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 



David Midgley 




Toxic green domed mushrooms add an 
amazing splash of colour to the 
substrate (top), a Gonipora waves 
its polyps in the current (middle) 
while below a beautifully patterned 
Merulina ampliata glows lime green 
under the LED lighting. 



When he's not editing Redfish Maga 
Midgley is a scientist who has a PhD in Microbic 
Ecology and works with microbes in the subsur- 
face. He lives in Sydney, Australia with his wife, kids 
cats and now - Reef Aquarium. 



months. 1 think mtj -favourite amongst them, is also 
perhaps the most sixbtle. The Yflicromussa aw.aku~ 
s&nsis has k?iAX§and§ striped polpys voith a tixro^oise 
base coloixr. The species comes in a host o£ colotxrs 
and there's some Moftwphically restricted variants. 




There's a striking pattern to this Micro- 
mussa amaiusensis (top), a filter feeding 

worm is visible at the top of the photo. 
The bicoloured Lobophyllia (bottom) makes 

for a striking contrast in the aquarium. 
It's being photobombed by my fast-growing 

Xenia, visible at the base of the photo! 



Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 35 



TOitk go ma.ni/) bright coIoiatg and Gkap&G, it's 
pretty dL-f-ficiA.lt to pick a tavoixntd 

J!v& h&&n in toack iA>itk mtj local aa^aniAwv Gtore 
uoko have b&&n QivmQ wv& gowv& ddvi.ee on poGi.- 
tioninQ of coralG. Tv&Y-t month, X' (1 $ociag in on tfiis 
tcpic - ds.GOA.GG a voat&r top-ap GQGt&Wi I'd k?& 
inGtalkng and give everyone an iA^dat& of \roW&r& 
tk& t^nk is at. Until tk&n - tfi^nks tor reading. 

Vavid, 1\ovemUr 2012. 





Last month I made an error, the urchins (top-right) I identified as as Trip- 
neuBtee are actually Meepilia globulus. Thanks to Aaron Sewell for the correc- 
tion. More lovely corals from Cairns Marine: Lobophyllia paohyeepta (right), a 
beautiful green Tr achy ophy Ilia (top-left) and BlastomuBBa wellei (bottom-left). 




Blog « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 36 




Khantipol 



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GOLDSADDLE 



GOATFISH 



Name: Goldsaddle Goatfish (Parupeneus cyclostomus) 
Family: Mullidate 

Distribution: Occurs in most tropical reef-associated oceans, the tropical Atlantic aside. 

Size: This is a large growing species reaching almost 50cm (20"). It follows therefore that it is best 
suited for specialists with very large aquariums. It is, however, frequently sold as a juvenile and 
prior to purchase, it's important to know about the requirements for the species. 

In the wild: Like most goatfish, the species spends most of its time in close to the seafloor, us- 
ing its barbels to probe the rubble, sand and holes in rocks for prey items. Prey is variable but can 
include small fishes, crabs, worms, octopi, shrimps and molluscs. Juvenile Goldsaddle Goatfish are 
social animals, forming schools while the adult fish is typically solitary. 

In the aquarium: Keeping the Goldsaddle Goatfish is challenging. It's size alone dictates that it is 
really only suitable for aquarists with very large aquariums (>500 litres, 130 gallons). Their invert 
eating habits dictate they are fish for a fish-only style of aquarium. The species are well-known 
jumpers so tight-fitting (potentially thick) glass lids are a must. Goatfish aren't aggressive per se, 
they are, however, carnivores and will consume small fishes that can fit in their mouths. This dic- 
tates that suitable tankmates be 1. non-territorial (though goatfish are agile and rapid swimmers 
and can usually get themselves out of harms way) and 2. also large sized. Think large Angelfish 
and the like. Feeding is straightforward for the Goldsaddle Goatfish, and like its namesake the goat, 
the species will consume most any kind of foods. Diligent goatfish owners should be sure to provide 
a varied diet that resembles the natural prey items the fish consumes. 

The aquarium filtration for goatfish is not overly different to that which one should provide for other 

large fish eating meaty (and . . 

messy foods). High circulation/ 

turnover is more important as the ^ 

goatfish create a degree of ad- 
ditional mess when turning over 
the substrate. 

Close: If you're wanting to try 
something different, have some 
experience under your belt with 
other large marine species and 
their husbandry then this goatfish 
is a great choice. If you're wan- 
dering through your local aquar- 
ium and wondering if you should 
add that cute little yellow goatfish | " 

to your reef tank - think again. Goldsaddle goatish are large, unusual and somewhat challenging species for the 

fish-only marine aquarium. Unless you're an expert, admire from a distance. 

Marine « Redfish Magazine 2012:16 » 38 



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Koi Society of Australia 

> Coffs Harbour 

Meets 14:00, last Sun. each month. 
7-9 Prince St. Bellingen. 

> Newcastle 

Meets 19:00, 1st Tue. each month. P: 
4959 6000 

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Meets 11:00, 1st Sun. each month. 
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Hall, West Pymbie. 

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Marine * 



, Aquarium Societv of 

| victoria (MAS0V) 

I http://ozreef.org/masov.html 

I e: dbw@ozreef.org 



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Aquarium Society 

http://www.edas.com.au/ 

Meets 4th Fri. each month, 

Willis Rm, Council Offices 

Nunawading. 

EDAS plant study group 
http://www.edaspsg.org/ 



New South Wales j 
Cichlid Society ! 

(NSWCS) | 

http ://www.nswcs . org. au/ 
Meets 19:30, 1st Sat. each 
month, Nuwarra Public 
School, Moorebank 

New South Wales Cichlid So- 
ciety (NSWCS) - lllawarra. 
Meets 19:30, 2nd Sun. each 
month, Kanahooka High 
School, Kanahooka. 

Australian Koi Association 
http://www.akakoi.com 



http://www.masa.asn.au/mass/ 
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massimasa.asn.au 


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Queensland 



MARINE ApUARIUM SOCIETY 
OF REGIONAL pUEENSLAND 
http://www.masrq.org 
e: info@masrq.org 

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ACT 



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Meets 19:30, 3rd Tue. each 
month. Harmonie German 
Club, Narrabundah. 

Canberra Killifish Study 
Group (CKSG) 
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tent/killi-corner 



SOfA TOR SALT 

|1200 OTfO 

Thane: Ji mmy Li 

Tunvood 



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http://www.angfaqld.org.au 



Cold Coast aquarium 
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HTTP:/AVWW.CCAS. NET.AU 



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org.au 

E: aandtsociety@gmail.com 




/ South Australia 
f « 



South Australian Aquarium 

Society Inc. 

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E: aandtsocietv@gmail.com 

^ee/?5/(W Cidh/id 
http '■/ /tocoto .aaid/h/iJ . 
Meet-S 20 : 00> K5t f~l~'i . 

each /ytonth- Bar Jai 
V/a//, C/a/Ae/d. 



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|o& i»"fy of UJA 

(yt\rK <C,uTTot\ 
0419 S56 106 



PeAtk 



CMu 



Sodeiu 



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ON 
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Koi Society of 

wwwkoicluWa.com 
Meets 19:30. 4th Wed. each 
moritii, Rotary Hall, South 
Perth 



fyiofiart &icf\l$ cfecfet^ wide Bay Aquarium Society 

, . ^lvV/-om wbaqs.com.au/forum/index.php 
i.tassiecicnlios.csm i 



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Magazine 2012:16 » 40 




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